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FIFA 21 rolls out Playtime tool to limit and track FIFA Points spending

FIFA 21 rolls out Playtime tool to limit and track FIFA Points spending

Electronic Arts is letting players track and limit how many FIFA Points they buy in FIFA 21.

As reported by Eurogamer, this is part of a new set of tools called FIFA Playtime, which has already been rolled out onto PC and will be hitting consoles on November 17th. This will allow players to see how many of the in-game currency FIFA Points they have bought, as well as place limits on how many they can buy.

You can't see how much you have spent in real-world money as these transactions are between players and the platform they are using, rather than directly with EA.

Playtime is part of a new long-term initiative called the Positive Play Project, which is aiming to make video games safer to play.

“Play should always be fun, so we’re ramping up the information and tools to help you play on your terms,” the company wrote in a blog post.

“Back in June, we rolled out the Positive Play Charter – an updated set of community guidelines designed to make our games and services more inclusive, safe, balanced and fair. This is another step we’re taking to make play more positive.”

This comes after games companies, including EA, are facing legal troubles over loot boxes within its video games. The publishing giant is currently the subject of several class-action lawsuits around the world and is being fined by the Netherlands Gambling Authority over FIFA loot boxes.


PCGamesInsider Contributing Editor

Alex Calvin is a freelance journalist who writes about the business of games. He started out at UK trade paper MCV in 2013 and left as deputy editor over three years later. In June 2017, he joined Steel Media as the editor for new site PCGamesInsider.biz. In October 2019 he left this full-time position at the company but still contributes to the site on a daily basis. He has also written for GamesIndustry.biz, VGC, Games London, The Observer/Guardian and Esquire UK.

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